Logo

Get Healthy!

Recent health news and videos.

Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

23 Jun

Updated Mammography Guidance

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Issues New Breast Cancer Screening Guidelines

22 Jun

Technology and Hand Pain

Intensive gadget use may up your risk of carpal tunnel syndrome, study finds

21 Jun

Genetic Mutations and Cancer

Estimating the absolute risk of breast and ovarian cancer among carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic mutations

Fish Eaters Report Less Rheumatoid Arthritis Pain

FRIDAY, June 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Eating fish at least twice a week may significantly reduce the pain and swelling associated with rheumatoid arthritis, a new study says.

Prior studies have shown a beneficial effect of fish oil supplements on rheumatoid arthritis symptoms, but less is known about the value of eating fish contai...

Fewer U.S. Kids Binge Drinking

FRIDAY, June 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new federal report finds that fewer U.S. teens and young adults are indulging in frat-party style drinking because their levels of binge drinking have gone down over the past six years.

But not all teens and young adults are forgoing extra drinks. Fourteen percent of young people from 12 to 2...

Some Republicans Voice Concerns About Senate Replacement for Obamacare

FRIDAY, June 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Senate Republicans' efforts to pass a health-care reform bill designed to undo major parts of the Affordable Care Act are facing push back from at least eight members of their own party.

If that opposition holds, it would scuttle the GOP proposal, released Thursday, to repeal and replace the he...

  • Dennis Thompson
  • |
  • June 23, 2017
  • |
  • Full Page

Can Smartphone Use Bring on Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

FRIDAY, June 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People who spend lots of time on their smartphones may be scrolling, tapping and swiping their way to carpal tunnel syndrome, a painful wrist and hand disorder.

A small study found a link between extended use of smartphones and other hand-held electronic devices and a greater likelihood for exp...

Choosing the Right Sunglasses

FRIDAY, June 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- You might think of eye problems like cataracts as signs of old age, but one step you can take now will protect your vision for the future -- and you can do it with style.

We're talking about sunglasses.

Your eyes need to be protected from the dangers of UV light the same way your ski...

Need Braces? Say Goodbye to 'Metal-Mouth' Taunts

FRIDAY, June 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Braces have long been a kind of geeky right-of-passage -- something that must be endured for a few years to ensure a lifelong smile with straight teeth.

Fortunately, braces have evolved over the years. They've gotten smaller and more options are available for those who need them, according to t...

Regular Sleep Makes for Happier College Students

FRIDAY, June 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Between studying and socializing, college students often have crazy sleep schedules, and new research suggests that a lack of regular sleep may dampen students' well-being.

"We found that week-long irregular sleep schedules are significantly associated with lower self-reported morning and eveni...

Guided Exercise May Help Chronic Fatigue Patients: Study

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An expert-guided, self-help exercise program may help people with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), a new study suggests.

Two hundred CFS patients did workouts for 12 weeks with phone or online video support from a physiotherapist. The program slowly increases physical activity (such as a few m...

Mammogram Decision Hinges on Patient-Doc Talk, Ob-Gyn Group Says

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- As the debate continues about the best time for mammograms, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) is asking women to add their voice to the discussion.

In updated guidelines on breast cancer screening for average-risk women, ACOG emphasized shared decision-making bet...

  • Kathleen Doheny
  • |
  • June 22, 2017
  • |
  • Full Page

Lifestyle Changes Might Prevent or Slow Dementia

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Simple changes to your lifestyle might delay the start of dementia or slow its progression, a new report suggests.

Some scientific evidence indicates that keeping your mind active through "cognitive training," controlling your blood pressure and exercising more may pay dividends in terms of ...

  • Steven Reinberg
  • |
  • June 22, 2017
  • |
  • Full Page

Legalized Pot May Lead to More Traffic Crashes

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Although states where recreational marijuana is legal may have experienced a slight bump in traffic collisions, the good news is that there wasn't an increase in crash-related fatalities compared to other states, two new studies show.

Insurance claims data show that Colorado, Washington and O...

  • Dennis Thompson
  • |
  • June 22, 2017
  • |
  • Full Page

Heart Disease: A Price Humans Pay for Fertility?

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Certain genes linked to heart disease may also improve your chances of having children, a new study suggests.

Australian researchers said the findings seem to offer a potential explanation for why evolution has allowed these genes to persist for centuries.

While lifestyle is clearly...

Senate Republicans Reveal Their Replacement for Obamacare

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Attempting to thread a very tight needle, Senate Republicans on Thursday released a health-care reform bill intended to undo major parts of the Affordable Care Act while still supporting the public's access to health insurance.

The 142-page bill, crafted behind closed doors, would result in m...

  • Dennis Thompson
  • |
  • June 22, 2017
  • |
  • Full Page

Tissue Testing Can Spot Zika at Birth: CDC

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to the Zika virus in pregnancy can wreak havoc on babies, but diagnosing the infection before birth remains a challenge. Now, there's some good news: U.S. health officials say testing placental and fetal tissue after a child is born can confirm or rule out infection.

Such testing fou...

  • Margaret Farley Steele
  • |
  • June 22, 2017
  • |
  • Full Page

Too Few Women, Docs Understand Dangers of Heart Disease

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease is the leading killer of U.S. women, but many women and their doctors don't recognize the danger.

A survey of more than 1,000 women between 25 and 60 years of age found 45 percent were unaware that heart disease is the No. 1 cause of death for women in America.

Most r...

OCD May Be Linked to Inflammation in the Brain: Study

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have high levels of brain inflammation, a discovery researchers say could lead to new treatments.

In OCD, people typically have frequent, upsetting thoughts that they try to control by repeating certain rituals or behaviors, such as washing hand...

When is Tourette Syndrome Actually Autism?

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- More than one in five children with Tourette syndrome also tests positive for autism, a new study shows.

But it's unlikely that so many children actually have both disorders. What's more probable is that Tourette's symptoms often mimic or seem quite similar to those of autism, the researchers...

Most U.S. Teens Aren't 'Doing It'

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Sex is everywhere in the media, and so you may be convinced that today's teens are always looking to "hook-up." But new federal research says it's just not so.

Instead, the study found that most teenagers in high school aren't sexually active.

"The myth is that every kid in high sch...

  • Dennis Thompson
  • |
  • June 22, 2017
  • |
  • Full Page

Could Your Office Job Rob You of Vitamin D?

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Spending your days cooped up inside an office might mean you're not getting enough vital vitamin D -- know as the "sunshine vitamin," researchers report.

Canadian researchers found that vitamin D deficiency levels differ by occupation, with people who are closeted indoors faring worse than ot...

  • Steven Reinberg
  • |
  • June 22, 2017
  • |
  • Full Page

Secondhand Smoke Still Plagues Some Cancer Survivors

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The number of nonsmoking cancer survivors exposed to secondhand smoke is down significantly in the United States, but it's too soon to breathe easy.

A new review of federal data on nearly 700 nonsmoking adult cancer survivors found 15.7 percent reporting exposure to secondhand smoke in 2011...

Health News is provided as a service to Mumfrey's Pharmacy site users by HealthDay. Mumfrey's Pharmacy nor its employees, agents, or contractors, review, control, or take responsibility for the content of these articles. Please seek medical advice directly from your pharmacist or physician.
Copyright © 2017 HealthDay All Rights Reserved.